Yōhen Yuteki Tenmoku Tea Ceremony Bowl by Kamada Kōji

Kamada Koji's name in Japanese

KK457

Yōhen Yuteki Tenmoku Tea Ceremony Bowl by Kamada Kōji: click to enlarge

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Yōhen Yuteki Tenmoku Tea Ceremony Bowl by Kamada Kōji Yōhen Yuteki Tenmoku Tea Ceremony Bowl by Kamada Kōji Yōhen Yuteki Tenmoku Tea Ceremony Bowl by Kamada Kōji Yōhen Yuteki Tenmoku Tea Ceremony Bowl by Kamada Kōji Yōhen Yuteki Tenmoku Tea Ceremony Bowl by Kamada Kōji
Yōhen Yuteki Tenmoku Tea Ceremony Bowl by Kamada Kōji Yōhen Yuteki Tenmoku Tea Ceremony Bowl by Kamada Kōji Yōhen Yuteki Tenmoku Tea Ceremony Bowl by Kamada Kōji Yōhen Yuteki Tenmoku Tea Ceremony Bowl by Kamada Kōji Yōhen Yuteki Tenmoku Tea Ceremony Bowl by Kamada Kōji
Yōhen Yuteki Tenmoku Tea Ceremony Bowl by Kamada Kōji Yōhen Yuteki Tenmoku Tea Ceremony Bowl by Kamada Kōji
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Description

Tenmoku holds an honored position in the history and development of tea ceremony in Japan. Tenmoku bowls were first introduced in the 13th century by Buddhist monks returning from their studies in China. They were highly regarded among the Ashikaga shoguns who used them extensively in the art of chanoyu, or Japanese tea ceremony.

Tenmoku artist Kamada Kōji takes this ancient technique to a higher level with radiant works like this yōhen yuteki tea ceremony bowl.  Inside the kiln, yōhen yuteki goes through an amazing transformation.  At a temperature of around 1,232°C (2,250°F), the wood ash in the glaze begins to separate from its heavier iron layer and vitrifies on the surface in feathery streams.  The resulting effect is simply transcendent - like the veins of a moth's wing in the sunlight.

The body of the bowl is deftly formed to an exacting thinness, flaring out from the center at a lower angle.  This not only allows whipped matcha green tea to cool more quickly, but affords a wider view of the true quality of yōhen yuteki which, on this piece, radiates hues of gold and bronze.

With links to tenmoku's past and present, the bowl is the ideal acquisition for any collector with an interest in chanoyu.

Kamada Kōji's tenmoku works are held in private collections around the world and, in 2005, were acquired by New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art for display in their Asian Art collection.
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A wooden presentation box will be custom made to order and signed by the artist.  Delivery time for this item is 2 weeks.

A fukusa display cloth is included.

View Kamada Kōji's Profile  |  View all works by this artist.

Shipping Fees
 incmlbsg
diameter 5.0" 12.8    
height 2.7" 7.0    
weight     1.54 700
2000 Cranes Satisfaction Seal